Month: October 2016

Opportunities in Art

Everything changes continuously and the art world is no difference. I develop myself as an artist, my work evolves alongside and also the art world makes progress in a haphazard way.

At the beginning of my career I was an art school graduate visiting galleries with my portfolio. I studied the gallery advertisements and called them for an appointment when I thought my work would fit in. We would meet and when we felt a match we joined forces. This resulted in long-term contacts allowing me to present new work in the said gallery on a regular basis. I did not sell much, my work was considered the abstract note next to their more commercial items, the ones that did sell. I sometimes made a special piece for an art trail in a park of a public garden. At that very beginning I even received some money once for making and exhibiting my work. I was given a scholarship which allowed me a meagre sustenance while developing myself as an artist. I thought I had it made. Sales would start growing at some point, I worked hard and my reputation would grow. People just had to get to know me a little better before they would start buying my work.

Then I had children and disappeared off the face of the earth for a couple of years. The change in my personal life was so enormous that it also changed my work. Apart from that I was in a constant state of exhaustion due to the broken nights, I was just busy all day with my little ones. They were most important at that moment. But when my daughter was two years old I was crying out to exhibit again. I had made some things during those years but smaller and much more intimate than my previous work. And I no longer cared if people would like it or not, making accommodating things had become unbearable.

I woke up in a different world. Galleries had closed, not just one but lots of them. And that was only the beginning. I was no longer a bright young talent but a woman with children. And in this depleted world of art exhibition the galleries now asked me to pay them for exhibiting my work. I felt a strong rebellion against that. (In order to create my work I already have to make considerable investments and the making of an exhibition also costs money. The driving back and forth, materials needed to exhibit the work all cost money.) Artists had been declared Cultural Entrepreneur. Nowadays it’s completely normal to pay for the possibility to exhibit.

This change in art selling locations is still going on at the moment. Online galleries are rising. Artists are putting themselves on the market, literally. Galleries are still collapsing all the time, well-known places can’t manage it anymore. The way art is treated in this country is part of the problem. According to our government art is no longer valued. Therefore many artist escape abroad. To co operations and short-term exhibitions. To fairs. To new places that had never before been considered suitable for exhibitions.

Do you like art? There are numerous artist who would love to transform your living room into an exhibition area for a weekend. Just open up your house to guests and invite your network contacts. Throw a nice party! You will end up with an exclusive exhibition in your own home, helping out an artist and create an experience for your guests they will continue to talk about for a long time.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9568033

How to Approach Promotional Modeling Agencies

Promotional modeling is a specific form of modeling targeted at promoting a good, service or brand. It is not to be confused with being an ambassador for a brand, but rather its primary intention is to create a positive appeal for the brand in order to boost sales.

How should you Look Like?

The harsh truth of the industry is that a certain standard or conventional body size and beautiful figure will be expected of you in promotional modeling. This is because clients would naturally want themselves and the public to associate these models positively with their brand. The restrictions are definitely much lower than that of fashion models, and the work is relatively much less stressful, however, in general, a height of above 165cm and a slender figure would be expected.

Also keep in mind when approaching a modeling agency to not wear anything too grand or fanciful. Anything that you are comfortable with, akin to a t-shirt and jeans style, is enough during your casting call or audition. This is because as a promotional model there will be a large variety of clothes you will wear depending on your client’s contract offer, hence just wear simple clothes, with simple makeup and let the clients and modeling agencies use their creativity to assess the suitability of your look with the style that they want.

Communicative Skills

Work on speaking fluently and confidently when you approach a modeling agency. As a promotional model looking good is just one aspect; a more important aspect is your ability to sell a product, service or idea. You should be able to engage with customers in conversation and convince them of your product or service’s benefits.

This becomes even more important if you can establish yourself to be a spokes model. You will sign a contract with a company and represent the company as the face of the brand. You would be appearing in advertisements, traveling around, and meeting with various people associated with your brand. You should thus be able to articulate the work you do and add value to the brand, product or service you are modeling for.

Research on the Various Industry Types

There are a plethora of industries promotional models can be in. You should identify some key industries of your interest and identify the modeling agencies that have successfully placed models in such industries. For example, if you love cars or love motor vehicles, perhaps the design, speed and other aspects of it, then your interest to work as a promotional model could likely lie in the automobile industry. You should then approach an agency by researching on their background work first and in your first interview state your passion and preferences for the industry and work you would like to be involved in.

However, if you are a model starting out don’t get too choosy. Take up the job opportunities you get first. Gain industry experience, modeling expertise and prove your worth to the agency. Soon enough you will be considered for the modeling work that you like. Your networking skills will not only land you the job as a promotional model but will also mean how fast you progress in the industry.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9593331

Important Terms That Every Model Should Be Familiar With

Any aspiring model has a need or responsibility to know and be familiar with the day-to-day terms and Jargons of the industry.

Agency

This refers to the model agency you have signed up for. Modeling agencies are responsible for their model’s safety, overall job experience, payment and every other aspect of their job.

Bookers

They are also known as model managers and are the main point of contact for models and clients. Bookers have an important responsibility of acquiring clients, selecting the right models and rate of payment for each job. They also have to inform relevant models of job opportunities and every other relevant detail.

Casting Call

Casting calls are different from agency interviews, and specific to clients and the jobs you are applying for as a model. Agency interviews ask general questions and want to find out more about you as person and to see what type of modeling job would suit you best as a model. Casting call met out specific requirements requested by clients, such as specific age, ethnicity, gender that potential clients are expecting.

Client

Client refers to the person or organization that seeks a modeling agency to hire models for their specific project or job need. In general there are 2 categories, commercial and fashion clients. Commercial projects, such as television commercials or print advertisements need people of various types and most models are eligible for these jobs. Another is fashion, whereby clients are usually from editorials, runway modeling etcetera.

Comp card

Short for composite card is a business card for models that is given to clients as well. It contains headshots on the front, and body shots on the back of the card usually. It also contains a model’s vital statistics.

Close-up shot

Another term for headshot or portrait photo where the model’s neck and face are focused upon in the photo (can sometimes include shoulders). Facial features and emotional expressions thus take high importance in these shots.

Portfolio

Contains comp card, test shoots, other project photos and all the important details and information about a model. If a client is interested in a model, a portfolio of that model is presented to the client for their consideration.

Scouters

Sometimes known as a Scouting agent, is the person who is responsible for finding and attracting new and potential models into the agency. They go to city centers and other high profile events such as beach parties to seek for talent, and offer them opportunities to join the agency. Scouters are trained to be aware of the industry needs and are required to be professional in their engagement with the public.

Vital Statistics

These are important numbers that indicate what category of modeling you will belong to. This helps narrow down and place you in jobs that suit your body type. The 3 numbers that consist of your vital stats are the bust, waist and hip size.

With the above important terms, we hope that you will be able to use this knowledge effectively to communicate better as a model.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9643167

I Want to Be a Model, But Where Do I Start?

If you only have a gut feeling about becoming a model and you aren’t very sure, the question becomes, where do I start? Don’t worry; you aren’t alone in thinking as such. Many of the best models in the world, even up to the ranks of popular Victoria’s Secret runway models, started with as much uncertainty as you. We reveal some of the important steps to take on how to start getting model job.

Find out what type of modeling fits you

Everyone has the potential to be a model, but not everyone can be a fashion model. You have to find out what modeling type your body sizes and dimensions will fit in best. If you are tall (above 165cm) you may be suited for fashion runways and editorials, but if you are short (below 160cm) commercial and print modeling will suit you better. There are ambiguous cases, such as model Kate Moss, where shorter models can become a good runway model. However, such cases are rarer and at least for a start, you will have to be realistic and recognize categories that your looks fit in suitably.

Choosing the agency that develops your style

Different agencies have different specializations. Some agencies accept and groom all types of models, some others stick to one. You now have to do your homework and make a list of agencies and the different types of model jobs they offer. Are you willing to try a variety of modeling job types or you want to focus on a specific area of modeling? Choose the agency appropriate to your ability and interests.

While checking your preferred agency, watch out for other important information that assures the agency is genuine and has a good reputation. Narrow down your options to a select the important few agencies that are best for you.

Applying into the agency

Any excellent agency will have frequent casting calls and readily book interview appointments for aspiring models. Search their social media and websites for information on upcoming casting calls and if you fit the female model requirements immediately apply for it. You can also apply through their website or call them directly and book an appointment. Calling is the most recommended way as you can clear your doubts easily and be more aware of what the agency expects from you.

Take a few Snapshots and a Proper resume

Some basic documents an agency expects at the start are your resume and a few basic snapshots of your face and body. You don’t have to spend a lot of money on your photos; a few simple smartphone photos will see you through. The agency itself will be taking professional shots for your portfolio, and your photos are just for them to have a rough sense of how you look on camera. Your resume should show that you are more than a pretty face, who is committed and talented. This impresses the agency and improves your chances of getting accepted.

Now all you need is your patience to wait out for the agency to respond. If your looks satisfy the agency they won’t ignore your application and give you a response in a reasonable amount of time. Sometimes if they have too many models they might ask you to apply at a later date. Note down all their responses and keep following up with them.

Even top models like Tyra Banks had to face multiple rejections before their first chance. Be patient and opportunities will come your way. Principally, don’t let fear or being shy prevent you from trying. We wish you all the best in your modeling career.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9643788